Collection: Blindness and the visually deprived

Cubism

Analytical Cubism:

The period from 1910 to 1912 is referred to as Analytical Cubism. Paintings executed during this period showed the breaking down, or analysis, of form. Right-angle and straight-line construction were favoured, though occasionally some areas of the painting appeared sculptural, as in Picasso's "Girl with a Mandolin" (1910). Colour schemes were simplified, tending to be nearly monochromatic (hues of tan, brown, gray, cream, green, or blue preferred) in order not to distract the viewer from the artist's primary interest--the structure of form itself. The monochromatic colour scheme was suited to the presentation of complex, multiple views of the object, which was now reduced to overlapping opaque and transparent planes. These planes appear to ascend the surface of the canvas rather than to recede in depth. Forms are generally compact and dense in the centre of the Analytical Cubist painting, growing larger as they diffuse toward the edges of the canvas, as in Picasso's "Portrait of Ambroise Vollard".

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Synthetic Cubism:

Interest in the subject matter continued after 1912, during the phase called Synthetic Cubism. Works of this phase emphasise the combination, or synthesis, of forms in the picture. Colour is extremely important in the pieces' shapes because they become larger and more decorative. Smooth and rough surfaces are contrasted with one another; and frequently non-painted objects such as newspapers or tobacco wrappers, are pasted on the canvas in combination with painted areas. This collage technique emphasizes the differences in texture and poses the question of what is reality and what is illusion in painting.

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GEORGES BRAQUE

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By 1910, Braque was closely working with Picasso. Around that time the art movement known as Cubism slowly took shape.

Their paintings tried to show objects from every direction at once—a truly Cubist, or multi-sided perspective.

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Clarinet and bottle of rum on mantlepiece

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Female Figure

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Guitar

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Fruitdish and ace of clubs

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Violin and candlestick

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Pitcher and Violin

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Man with guitar

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PABLO PICASSO

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Picasso's "Still Life with Chair-Caning". The first collage.

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Still Life with a Bottle of Rum

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Girl with a Mandolin

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Violin

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Portrait of a Man

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Analytic cubism (1909–1912) is a style of painting Picasso developed with Georges Braque using monochrome brownish and neutral colours. Both artists took apart objects and "analyzed" them in terms of their shapes. Picasso and Braque's paintings at this time share many similarities. Synthetic cubism (1912–1919) was a further development of the genre, in which cut paper fragments – often wallpaper or portions of newspaper pages – were pasted into compositions, marking the first use of collage in fine art.

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